Dexamethasone Intracameral Drug-Delivery Suspension for Post-Op Inflammation

MAY 08, 2020
Patrick Campbell
New research due to be presented at the 2020 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) annual meeting is shedding light on the efficacy of an anterior chamber intracameral dexamethasone drug-delivery suspension (Dexcyu) for inflammation following vitreoretinal surgery.

Carried out by Daniel Kiernan, MD, a vitreoretinal surgeon with the Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island, results of the retrospective comparison indicate the approach could allow for greater anterior chamber cell clearing at 7 days post-surgery than topical corticosteroids.

In an effort to further evaluate whether the sustained release of medication through dexamethasone intracameral drug-delivery suspension could sufficiently treat postoperative inflammation compared with daily topical corticosteroids, Kiernan conducted the analysis using a case-matched cohort of 54 patients. Of the 54, 27 eyes of 27 patients received dexamethasone intracameral drug-delivery suspension and 27 eyes of 27 patients received corticosteroid drops for 4 weeks.

Of note, all 54 patients included in the study had a preoperative BCVA of 20/20 to light perception.

The primary efficacy outcome of the study was anterior chamber cell clearing—defined as 0 cells—in the study eye at postoperative day 7. Kiernan also assessed for serious ocular events through day 90.

Upon analysis, anterior chamber cell clearing occurred in 67% of the intracameral dexamethasone group compared to 37% of patients treated with topical corticosteroids (P=.029). Additionally, no serious ocular adverse events were noted up to postoperative day 90.

To learn more about dexamethasone intracameral drug-delivery suspension and its use in a clinical setting, HCPLive® reached out to Kiernan to take part in a special ARVO 2020 edition of the DocTalk Podcast.




This study, "Dexamethasone intracameral drug-delivery suspension for inflammation associated with vitreoretinal surgery," was published in BMJ Open Ophthalmology.

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