Jeffrey Weinberg, MD: Psoriasis Duration Doesn't Impact Brodalumab Success

MARCH 01, 2019
Cecilia Pessoa Gingerich
According to a new analysis, the success of brodalumab for treating patients with psoriasis didn’t vary based on the duration of psoriasis. Patients who had been diagnosed with psoriasis for over 10 years responded comparably to patients with more recent diagnoses.

Jeffrey Weinberg, MD, an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City, spoke with MD Magazine® about the data at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in Washington, DC.

“What I think that this helps to double down on and emphasize is that no matter how long someone's had their psoriasis this drug will still be effective for them,” Weinberg told MD Mag. Watch the full interview below.

The poster, “Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Brodalumab by Duration of Psoriasis: Analysis of Two Phase 3 Studies,” will be presented at the AAD Annual Meeting on Saturday, March 2, 2019.



MD Mag: What data will you be presenting at AAD 2019?

Weinberg: Well the data that I'm presenting is on the biologic brodalumab. This is an IL-17 receptor blocker and it is one of the 3 biologics in the class that deal with the IL-17 in IL-17 receptor. The data that we're looking at today is looking at response—by investigator assessment and by patient assessment—of people who've had psoriasis for different durations.

What are the topline results for brodalumab in this analysis?

The topline data that I'm going to share is that regardless of duration of psoriasis, that patients had a very high response as measured by PASI [Psoriasis Area and Severity Index] scores and also had a high response as measured by either a DLQI [Dermatology Life Quality Index] of 0 or 1, which equates to high quality of life, and also by the PSI [Psoriasis Symptom Inventory] score, which is psoriasis score, which had to be less than equal to 8.

Why is this brodalumab data important for clinicians?

Well, I think that we know that brodalumab is certainly one of the most effective drugs that we have for the treatment of psoriasis and what I think that this helps to double down on and emphasize is that no matter how long someone's had their psoriasis this drug will still be effective for them. And when you look at those different ranges it doesn't matter whether it's a new onset or a person who's had it for more than 10 years and I think this is very important when we make choices about the biologics we use because we know that sometimes people who have had longer disease or been biologic failures are more difficult to treat, but when we take this group and we put them together and then we find out that the treatment does not vary despite those differences, I think that is very significant.

Copyright© MD Magazine 2006-2019 Intellisphere, LLC. All Rights Reserved.