Mayo Clinic Named Top Hospital by US News

AUGUST 08, 2017
Matt Hoffman
The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota was named the nation’s top hospital for the second consecutive year by US News and World Report in its annual honor roll of best hospitals.

The Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio was named the top cardiovascular center, while the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas took the top cancer center spot for the second straight year, and the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, New York grabbed the top orthopedics honor.

In total, this year’s list included 152 hospitals ranked in at least one specialty, and 535 regional hospitals were ranked by state and metropolitan area.

The Mayo Clinic was nationally ranked in 15 adult specialties and 9 pediatric specialties, according to US News. It admitted 54,713 patients in its most recently reported year and performed 26,416 inpatient and 31,929 outpatient surgeries.

On the list of best hospitals, Cleveland Clinic took the second spot for the second straight year, and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland placed third, up from fourth the previous year.

The top five was rounded out by Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and UCSF Medical Center, in San Francisco, California, respectively.

The US News rankings are in their 28th year, comparing more than 4,500 hospitals and medical centers across the United States, providing rankings in 25 categories consisting of 16 specialties, and 9 procedures and conditions.

Hospitals were graded on a points system, earning points for being nationally ranked in any of the 16 specialties available, according to the magazine. The maximum number of points a hospital can receive is 480, receiving more points for higher ranks and the number of specialties it ranked in.

The Mayo Clinic received 415 points, while the Cleveland Clinic earned 365, Johns Hopkins 363, Massachusetts General 358, and UCSF took 303.

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